In the 2015 Delhi elections, Arvind Kejriwal didn't just demolish his opposition; he also defeated the media. That might seem a strange thing to say since the general impression for a long time has been that Kejriwal and his AAP party are a creation of the media, and television news in particular. The fact is, February 2015 is not December 2013. Then, we couldn't get enough of Kejriwal: he was popping in and out of tv studios and every move, every soundbite of his, was tracked with relentless energy. 'Would you do it with any other chief minister?' I recall Narendra Modi asking me once in a phone conversation.

There is nothing quite like an Indian election: it is, to borrow from The Times of India's slogan, 'the dance of democracy'. Yesterday, was yet another remarkable moment in India's electoral history. There was a general feeling ahead of counting day that AAP was in the lead. My own figure in the office sweepstakes was a half century for AAP. But no one, least of all Arvind Kejriwal himself, could have imagined 67 out of the 70 seats.

It is now almost seven months since Delhi hasn't had an elected government. Arvind Kejriwal's act of political harakiri in February 2014 pushed the Lieutenant Governor into the spotlight. Under the constitution, the LG has to make every possible effort to see if a government can be formed

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The 2014 Indian general elections has been regarded as the most important elections in Indian history since 1977.
A parable on the limitations of vision and the dark side of love. This book presents a story of life's distorted perceptions
These are stories of ordinary people who are doing extraordinary work for our society and our nation.